Food & Nutrition

27 Foods That Taste So Much Better in the Fall

Georgia pecans

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Pecan pie is a favorite at Thanksgiving. But eating a handful of fresh Georgia pecans is an experience you won’t soon forget. Bonus: Pecans can balance out your gut flora and fight inflammation. According to Lawton Pearson of Pearson Farm, Fort Valley, GA, the superb taste is from a combination of genetics and the red dirt in which they are grown. But what really makes them taste better is the higher concentration of oil versus other pecan producing regions. “The best pecans are always fresh, right after fall harvest,” says Pearson. “Bright yellow and browns are the colors of fresh pecans. Dark brown to almost black or red are the colors of old or poorly stored pecans,” says Pearson. You won’t want to miss the best fall food festivals in America.

Persimmons

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Persimmons are another in-season food you’ll want to try. They resemble a tomato, but have a much sweeter taste. Bake them or eat scarf them raw, but don’t pass up persimmons, says Chef Nathan. There will likely be two varieties—the fuyu and hachiya.”Yellow, orange and red in color, the fuyu is wonderful to enjoy when it’s firm, with the texture like an apple or soft, sporting a unique custard-like texture,” says Chef Lyon. They boast flavors of cinnamon, brown sugar and dates. “A ripe hachiya is is ultra sweet and can be eaten by cutting the fruit in half and spooning out the jelly-like flesh,” notes Lyon. Nutritionally speaking, they pack about a fifth of your fiber and vitamin C needs, and provide more than half of your daily vitamin A. Use these tricks for spotting farmers market food that isn’t fresh or local.

Shellfish

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If you want to satisfy your umami taste buds, oysters, muscles, scallops and clams are especially savory in the fall. According to Pangea Shellfish Company, these shellfish are seasonal creatures that hibernate in the winter, so they’re eating like crazy to fatten up before the cool waters arrive. The extra food builds up their glycogen stores and makes them sweet and plump during the fall months.

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