Food & Nutrition

9 of the Most Powerful Eating Habits to Protect Your Brain From Alzheimer’s

Everything from how you cook meat to what you eat for dessert can play a role in your brain health. Here, how to eat to prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Fill up on fewer calories

Thai Beef SaladMaggiezhu/Shutterstock

Start your meals with veggie-packed salads or soups, or use small plates to trick your brain into thinking your meals look bigger than they actually are. Filling up on fewer calories allows you to shed pounds, which can help reverse other risks for Alzheimer’s disease, including sleep apnea, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Cutting your daily intake of calories by 30 to 50 percent also reduces your metabolic rate and therefore slows oxidation throughout the body, including the brain. It lowers blood glucose and insulin levels, too.

Eat at least five servings of fruit and vegetables every day

A tabletop arrangement of a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables sorted by colorsDenise I Johnson/Shutterstock

Higher vegetable consumption was associated with slower rate of cognitive decline in 3,718 people aged 65 years and older who participated in the Chicago Health and Aging Project. Study participants filled out food logs and agreed to undergo tests of their cognitive abilities periodically for six years. All of the study participants scored lower on cognitive tests at the end of the study than they did at the beginning, but those who consumed more than four daily servings of vegetables experienced a 40 percent slower decline in their abilities than people who consumed less than one daily serving. Make sure you can recognize the 10 early signs of Alzheimer’s every adult should know.

Use spices liberally

Colorful herbs and spices in hexagonal glass jars. Natural colors and top view. Horizontal picture.Jonas Sjoblom/Shutterstock

Herbs and spices add flavor to food, allowing you to cut back on butter, oil, and salt. Because they come from plants, many herbs and spices also contain antioxidants and offer many healing benefits, including Alzheimer’s prevention. Several different studies show that curcumin, for example, helps to reduce the risk of cancer, arthritis, depression, and Alzheimer’s disease. Just a quarter teaspoon of the spice twice a day has been shown to reduce fasting blood sugar up to 29 percent in people with type 2 diabetes. This is important because type 2 diabetes can raise your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Marinate meat before cooking

Searing beef bottom round roast cubes in cast iron skillet , meat just added to hot oil , the upper sides are still redAri N/Shutterstock

When fat, protein, and sugar react with heat, certain harmful compounds form called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). They are found in particularly high levels in bacon, sausages, processed meats, and fried and grilled foods. The consumption of high amounts of AGEs has been shown to cause harmful changes in the brain. But there’s an easy way to slash your AGE consumption: Make your food (especially meats) as moist as possible. By boiling, braising, poaching, or marinating meat and fish before grilling or broiling, you allow moisture to permeate their flesh, dramatically reducing the AGEs.

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Healthy Eating – Reader's Digest

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