Food & Nutrition

9 Ways Your Kitchen Setup Can Help You Lose Weight (No Dieting Required)

Don’t keep family-sized snack packages around

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You’re more likely to eat more than one serving of chips or candy if you reach into a family-size bag than a single-serving package, says James Painter, PhD, emeritus professor at the school of family and consumer sciences at Eastern Illinois University. If you need to rip open a new bag every time you want more, you’ll have to rethink whether you really want seconds, he says. Individual packages are usually more expensive than bulk ones, so consider portioning big bags into zip-top snack bags instead. “Rip it open, grab a handful, put it into a sandwich bag and zip it,” Painter says. “It doesn’t need to be measured, and it takes 45 seconds.” Check out these genius portion control tricks for weight loss

Ignore your fridge design

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“Refrigerators are designed so the first thing you see when it’s opened is tall objects or meat and cheese in the second drawer, whereas vegetables and healthier foods are down below your knees,” Just says. Put produce on eye level, where you’ll be more likely to reach for it. Better yet, make your healthy food choices even more convenient by buying ready-to-eat baby carrots, or cut up peppers and apples before putting them in the fridge, Just suggests. This is what nutritionists always stock in their fridges.

Set the mood

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Playing soothing, classical instrumentals during meals could make you eat less because you automatically slow down your eating to match the music, Painter says. Make the atmosphere even more relaxing by dimming the lighting. When you eat slower, you’ll also be satisfied with smaller portions. “You’re not speeding yourself, you’re enjoying the food,” Painter says. Here are kitchen cabinet makeovers that could help you lose weight.

Opt for thinner glasses

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Tall, narrow glasses look like they’re holding more liquid than short, stout ones that contain the same exact volume. “The liquid stacks up thin, which makes it look like you’re getting more,” Just says. For sugary drinks, go with a taller glass, but reach for a shorter one when drinking water or milk.

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Healthy Eating – Reader's Digest

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