Food & Nutrition

Healthy Whole-Wheat Pumpkin Pancakes

stack of pumpkin pancakes with maple syrup with text overlay
stack of pumpkin pancakes with maple syrup with text overlay
stack of pumpkin pancakes with maple syrup with text overlay

These fluffy Whole-Wheat Pumpkin Pancakes are made with pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, buttermilk and the nourishing goodness of whole-grain flour. Serve up a hearty and wholesome stack with pure maple syrup for a healthy fall breakfast!

puring maple syrup over a tall stack of pumpkin pancakes with orange leaves in the foreground

Table of contents

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

These Pumpkin Pancakes may be my new favorite pancake for fall. (Cover your ears Apple Protein Pancakes and Gingerbread Apple Pancakes. I try not to play favorites for any of my recipes. But in this case, I am making exceptions.) Because… Fluffy! Pumpkin! Pancakes! Is there anything better?

These Healthy Pumpkin Pancakes are the perfect easy breakfast or brunch for fall weekends, or to make during the holidays when you have house guests. You can also make a big batch and freeze them to reheat on weekday mornings because they’re freezer friendly too!

Ingredient Notes

Whole-Wheat Flour

Look for white whole-wheat flour in the baking aisle or order it online. It can be used interchangeably with regular whole-wheat flour but the taste is not as strong and “wheaty.” You can also use regular whole-wheat flour.

Tip: Make sure to stir your flour, spoon it into your dry measuring cup then level it off to measure it accurately. This will help ensure that your batter will not be too thick!

Buttermilk

For the fluffiest whole-wheat pumpkin pancakes buttermilk is the best liquid to use. This will react with the baking soda to help them rise as they cook.

You can sub in milk mixed with lemon or vinegar if you do not have any buttermilk. Plain yogurt thinned with a little milk can also work because it is also acidic enough to activate the baking soda. Don’t use Greek yogurt because it is too thick.

Pumpkin Puree

You will need one cup of pure pumpkin puree. I used homemade pumpkin puree because I happened to have some on hand, but you can use canned pumpkin. Just make sure it is pure pumpkin and not the “pumpkin pie filling” which is mixed with sweetener, spices and dairy.

Tip: If you are wondering what to do with the remaining pumpkin from your can, make this Pumpkin Cornbread recipe. It is amazing!! Or try these Pumpkin Scones.

Pumpkin Pie Spice

You can use pumpkin pie spice or cinnamon in the pancake batter. I have had the pancakes flavored both ways and I am a big fan of either. {As I said, I am particularly fond of these pancakes!} If you do not have pumpkin pie spice on hand you can make your own from scratch!

How To Make Pumpkin Pancakes

preheat the griddle then mix the dry mix

Step 1: Preheat Griddle

Preheat the pancake griddle to medium-high heat, or pancake setting on an electric griddle (400 degrees F.)

Step 2: Mix Dry Ingredients

While the griddle heats, whisk flour, cinnamon or spice, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.

mixing the batter

Step3: Mix Wet Ingredients

Whisk eggs in a medium bowl until foamy. Beat in buttermilk, pumpkin and 2 tablespoons oil.

Step 4: Make Pancake Batter

Add dry ingredients and stir to combine. If the mixture thickens as it sits or is too thick, gently stir in up to 1/3 cup water to thin the batter.

cooking the pancakes

Step 5: Add Batter To Griddle

Lightly brush the griddle with ½ teaspoon oil. Ladle batter about 1/4 cup at a time onto the griddle, spacing so they do not run together. Cook the pancakes until browned on the bottom, 2 to 4 minutes.

Step 6: Flip Pancakes

Carefully flip the pancakes over and continue cooking until browned on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Keep cooked pancakes warm while cooking the remaining batter, re-brushing the griddle with the remaining oil as necessary.

a stack of pancakes with syrup on it

FAQs and Expert Tips

How to keep warm

Transfer the cooked pancakes to a baking sheet and keep warm in an oven set at 250 degrees F.

How to store leftovers

Place leftover pancakes on a plate and wrap with foil or plastic wrap or transfer to a re-sealable plastic bag. Refrigerate up to three days.

How to freeze

Freeze flat on a baking sheet. Once solid, transfer the frozen pancakes to a resealable plastic freezer bag and freeze up to one month. Make sure to press as much air out of the bag as possible. Thaw and heat through by placing them on a microwave-safe plate. Heat in the microwave on high for 1 minute and 20 seconds for 2 pancakes (do not stack when microwaving.)

How to reheat

To reheat refrigerated left-over pancakes heat in the microwave about 20 seconds per pancake. For best results do not overheat and keep the pancakes on the plate (not stacked) so that they heat through evenly. We do not recommend reheating in the oven as they get dried out.

How to make dairy free

You can make this dairy free by mixing lemon juice with a neutral unsweetened plant milk (we like oat milk best.) Place 2 tablespoons lemon in the bottom of the measuring cup then fill to the 1 3/4 cup line. Stir well.

Serving Suggestions

These pancakes are perfect with a little butter and maple syrup for a classic pairing, but here are some fun innovative ways of serving them!

  • Top with sliced bananas
  • Use honey instead of maple syrup
  • Try cinnamon infused maple syrup on top
  • Serve with bacon, sausage, turkey bacon or chicken apple sausage
  • Add chopped toasted pecans on top
  • Dollop with almond butter
  • Add on chocolate chips
  • Top with crunchy toasted pumpkin seeds or pepitas
  • Come up with your own topping ideas

Favorite Pancake Tools

The below section contains affiliate links.

Griddle: I definitely love having a good-quality stove-top griddle. Mine is All-Clad and it is very sturdy and thick. It heats evenly and really keeps the pancakes from burning like thinner griddles.

They are on the pricy side (about $100) but I have had mine for more than 15 years and we also use it to make quesadillas and grilled sandwiches too! We also have an inexpensive electric griddle, but I rarely take it out of storage because this stovetop one is so easy to clean!

Other Helpful Equipment

  • Silicone pastry brush: These heat-proof rubber brushes are perfect for brushing just a little bit of oil over the griddle. This helps prevent the pancakes from being greasy!
  • Dry measuring cups: These are essential for properly measuring flour and other dry ingredients.
  • Heatproof plastic spatula: I like this thin Oxo one that slides right under the pancakes and won’t scratch your griddle even if it is non-stick.

Thanks so much for reading. If you are new here, you may want to sign up for my free weekly email newsletter where I share weeknight meal plans delivered right to your inbox. Or follow me on Instagram. If you make this recipe, please come back and leave a star rating and review! It is very appreciated. Happy Cooking! ~Katie

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Description

These fluffy Whole-Wheat Pumpkin Pancakes are made with pumpkin puree, pumpkin pie spice, buttermilk and the nourishing goodness of whole-grain flour. Serve up a hearty and wholesome stack with pure maple syrup for a healthy fall breakfast!


  • 2 cups white whole-wheat flour or whole-wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 ¾ cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil, melted coconut oil or organic canola oil, plus 2 teaspoons for griddle
  •  1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract


  1. Preheat pancake griddle to medium-high heat, or pancake setting on an electric griddle (400 degrees F.)
  1. While griddle heats, whisk flour, cinnamon or spice, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.
  1. Whisk eggs in a medium bowl until foamy. Beat in buttermilk, pumpkin and 2 tablespoons oil.
  2. Add dry ingredients and stir to combine. If the mixture thickens as it sits or is too thick, gently stir in up to 1/3 cup water to thin the batter.
  3. Lightly brush griddle with ½ teaspoon oil. Ladle batter about 1/4 cup at a time onto the griddle, spacing so they do not run together. Cook the pancakes until browned on the bottom, 2 to 4 minutes.
  4. Carefully flip the pancakes over and continue cooking until browned on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Keep cooked pancakes warm while cooking the remaining batter, re-brushing the griddle with the remaining oil as necessary.

Notes

To Keep Warm

Transfer the cooked pancakes to a baking sheet and keep warm in an oven set at 250 degrees F.

Make Ahead, Storage and Freezing

Leftovers: Keep wrapped to prevent them from drying out. Refrigerate up to three days.

Freeze:  Freeze them flat on a baking sheet. Once solid, transfer the frozen pancakes to a resealable plastic freezer bag and freeze up to one month. Thaw and reheat in the microwave (about 1 minute and 20 seconds for 2 pancakes.)

Reheat: To reheat refrigerated left-over pancakes heat in the microwave for about 20 seconds per pancake.

Skillet Directions

This recipe can be made in a large non-stick skillet. Make sure to regulate the temperature of the pan between batches as it will get hotter and hotter as you go. Brush with additional oil as necessary.

  • Prep Time: 20 mins
  • Cook Time: 15 mins
  • Category: breakfast
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 2 pancakes
  • Calories: 231
  • Sugar: 5 g
  • Fat: 7 g
  • Carbohydrates: 31 g
  • Fiber: 6 g
  • Protein: 10 g

Keywords: whole wheat pumpkin pancakes,healthy pumpkin pancakes

About the Author

Katie Webster

Katie Webster studied art and photography at Skidmore College and is a graduate of the New England Culinary Institute. She has been a professional recipe developer since 2001 when she first started working in the test kitchen at EatingWell magazine. Her recipes have been featured in numerous magazines including Shape, Fitness, Parents and several Edible Communities publications among others. Her cookbook, Maple {Quirk Books} was published in 2015. She launched Healthy Seasonal Recipes in 2009. She lives in Vermont with her husband, two teenage daughters and two yellow labs. In her free time, you can find her at the gym, cooking, stacking firewood, making maple syrup, and tending to her overgrown perennial garden.

Source: healthyseasonalrecipes.com