Food & Nutrition

The Most Popular Candy the Year You Were Born

1992: Butterfinger BBs

via amazon.com

The Butterfinger candy bar (a brittle peanut butter-flavored core surrounded by milk chocolate) had been around since 1923, but in 1992, it became the darling of children everywhere with the introduction of a teeny tiny version: Butterfinger BBs. Unfortunately, unlike M&Ms, they did melt in your hands. When they were discontinued in 2006, there was such an uproar that Butterfinger re-introduced a slightly larger version in 2009: Butterfinger Bites (which are nowhere near as messy as Butterfinger BBs).

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1993: Warheads

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When it came to short-attention-span-management, Warheads candy took the opposite approach of Sour Patch Kids: Warheads started out as mildly sour, but after a moment or two, they turned super-duper sour. Like “your head’s going to explode” sour, according to this nostalgic fan. By the time you were done, the flavor had gone back to sweet-ish. But Warheads, which came to the United States in 1993 (having been invented in Taiwan in 1975), ushered in what would become, in the early aughts, a new age of extreme candy experiences.

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1995: Nestlé Magic Balls

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A Nestlé Magic Ball was a hollow milk chocolate ball, inside of which you’d find a small plastic character (a Disney or Pokémon character, for example). Although Nestlé insisted the candy/toy container was safe, many parents believed it represented a choking hazard, and by 1997, the Magic Ball was gone from candy shelves. In 2000, Nestlé re-released it as the “Wonder Ball,” with candy inside the chocolate shell, rather than teeny tiny toys. Beware: these seemingly adorable baby gifts are actually seriously unsafe.

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